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Scrabble : triple word score

It’s easy to give up. It’s even easier to mope – especially when a seemingly debilitating and career-ending injury makes it look like you’ve reached the end of your dream.

Drew Brees didn’t give up or mope for too long. I’m taking notes from him.

This NFL player incurred a shoulder injury that almost ended his career. He had to re-learn how to throw a football. In his book, “Coming Back Stronger,” Brees shares about his injury and how he came back from it.

The book is also about New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. The book chronicles the NFL and city’s comeback from devastating circumstances.

It’s a good lesson in perspective for me.

Sometimes it’s easy as a writer to take one defeat – a poorly written story, or multiple poorly-written stories – as signifying the end of a career.

This story is a great reminder to continue in what you’re called to do. Where it gets tricky is allowing God control and not taking control for yourself. When you work with words, it’s hard let the Lord lead you and not keep typing your own words.

It’s like playing Scrabble. Sure, you can put together words, but are they going to be a triple-word score or a five-point concession?

If I let Him guide me in Scrabble, I’ll be dancing in triple-word scores.

It’s the difference in one letter sometimes – coping and moping. Coping means accepting the tiles you’ve drawn and making something of it, moping means pouting and resigning yourself to your fate. The difference is between the “c” and the “m.”

I don’t have to know the next play in the Scrabble game either. You see what letters you have to work with after you commit to a play and are able to draw two new letters. In life, committing to a “word” or “play” that the Lord has revealed will lead to the next wordplay.

Sometimes there will be low-scoring word plays. Not every one will be a whopper. But, we’re promised peace that passes all understanding and direction better than we could supply.

So, like Drew Brees, don’t let the shoulder injury keep you from pursuing God’s calling on your life.

Tyndale Media Center provided me with a copy of “Coming Back Stronger.” My thoughts and opinions are my own.

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Run to Overcome

It’s an American Tale.

One of my favorite movies growing up was "An American Tail." I called it "Fievel" and didn't know its true title until adulthood.

"An American Tail" is about the Mousekewitz family–they are mice–that immigrate to the U.S. from Russia in the 1800s–painting a picture of the fabric America is built on.

Meb Keflezighi's story, similar in many ways to the Mousekewitzes, detailed in his book, "Run to Overcome," is an autobiographical tale of his Eritrean family's immigration to the U.S. and his emergence into the running scene.

The Keflezighi family left Eritrea amidst internal violence and made their way to San Diego in 1987–starting a whole new life as so many have done in the past.

It wasn't easy, starting a whole life in a new country never is, but the Keflezighi family's spirit and faith in God carried them through difficult times.

Meb Keflezighi and his 10 siblings worked hard and did well in school and received scholarships to California schools. During this time, in high school and college, Keflezighi blossomed as a runner.

Winner of the 2009 New York City Marathon and world-wide celebrated marathoner, Meb Keflezighi has much to brag about. But, instead of taking the credit, he points to God as the source of his strength in his personal and professional life. His story is a testimony to God's faithfulness through difficult times and stacked odds.

Running is Keflezighi's passion–a passion he excels at. As another famous runner once said, "When I run, I feel His pleasure."

"Run to Overcome" reminded me that life is a race. There are hard parts, there are struggles, there are times when you fall flat on your face. But, we are running to win a prize. Just as Keflezighi learned how to pace himself in races to not wear himself out too early, we need to learn pacing in our life. Life is not a sprint. Keflezighi learned how to run in a manner worthy of a prize.

I want to run throughout life with that kind of pacing.

“Winning in life doesn’t happen when you overcome just one thing–do or die. It’s persevering, knowing that difficulties are bumps in the road, not the end of the world. It’s continuing to do the right things, knowing your time will come. After all, you have to conduct yourself like a champion before you can ever win a championship.”

For more information about “Run to Overcome,” please see http://www.runtoovercome.com
Also, there is a contest on the above website and one signed book will be given away per day from Nov. 1, 2010 – Mar. 31, 2011.
There will be monthly grand prize winners that will receive a signed copy of the book, other free Tyndale titles, as well as Sony and PowerBar products.

I received this book courtesy of Tyndale House Publishers. My thoughts and opinions are my own.

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Filed under Book Reviews