On faith and fairy stories, part 4

This is the fourth and final installment in a series on faith, myth and allegory. If you’re just landing here, read post No. 1 here. What is it about myths that make them so engrossing and entrancing? Charlie W. Starr wrote an essay titled, “The Silver Chair and the Silver Screen: C.S. Lewis on Myth,…

On faith and fairy stories, part 3

This is the third installment in a series on faith, myth and allegory. If you’re just landing here, read post No. 1 here. The Chronicles of Narnia contains strong biblical allegories, “woven into their very fiber.”[1] The theme, Montgomery states, is the redemption of mankind through Christ. “To Tolkien and to Lewis, tales such as…

On faith and fairy stories, part 2

When arguing for the reality of literary myths, whether or not they actually happened is not really why people read them. One does not read Harry Potter truly believing that it did indeed happen, save for the most ardent Twitter fans who devote their entire online presence to Hogwarts and its inhabitants. No, the reader does not discard the story after learning it did not exist. Reading books like Harry Potter is an invitation to a journey and an adventure and this adventure is desirable.

On Frodo and Fairies

There’s nothing quite like curling up in a recliner or in the warmth of your bed with a great book that, in a way, draws you in through the cover into the pages and transforms you into something like an invisible observer of the plot — think Scrooge in A Christmas Carol. A good story,…

Security guards and doctors without municipal borders

One of our security guards is so sweet, so earnest. He spoke to my roommate and I our first day asking if we could write our names down. He wants to practice English. He capitalizes on every opportunity to speak with us. “It was a pleasure to talk with you,” he’ll say, beaming. He also…