Outlive Your Life

The world would be different if Christians stood up and did something about it.

I’m not talking about the amorphous body that we like to refer to when talking about the need for social action and justice. I am talking about you. You are the body of Christ. I think many times we tend to forget ourselves when talking about what the body of Christ should or should not do.

Like the Good Book says, (said in Tevye’s voice from the Fiddler on the Roof) don’t point out the speck in your neighbor’s eye when you’ve got a plank in your own.

Max Lucado’s book, “Outlive Your Life,” talks about making a difference — letting our actions live past our lives.

“May you live in such a way that your death is just the beginning of your life,” Lucado writes in his opening chapter.

Lucado draws from the book of Acts to share and show how the early church’s actions ring throughout the annals and panels of time.

Oh, if the church of the 21st century were to live in such a way that each of us are Cornelius’ and Phillips.

Changing the world and making a difference starts on an individual level. It’s the everyday choices you make. It’s choosing to help refugees get settled in American life, it’s giving your leftover meal to a beggar and it’s inviting people into your home. Outliving your life starts with the people around you.

Lucado’s book is a needed message for me and for you.

Thoughts?

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2 Comments

Filed under Book Reviews

2 responses to “Outlive Your Life

  1. Sam Chen

    We often look at the Church in Acts (see Acts 2, for example) and we marvel at this “radical Christianity.” But the Church in Acts isn’t a model of the radical Church, it is a model of *the* Church. It isn’t super Christians who live like those in Acts, it is *anyone* who calls him or herself a Christian ought to live in that manner.

    How we live our lives reflects what we see our purpose as. We are not here to be saved; we are here to glorify God. Some of us will die for it. But, in the least, let all of us live for it.

    Jesus is not the answer. He is the question. The answer is yes.

    PS- Tessa, your posts are always so thoughtful. Thank you for doing what you are doing. Continue to run the good race. I’m cheering for you.

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